#AIinPR group kicks off with crowdsourced tool project

#AIinPR group kicks off with crowdsourced tool project

A new panel launched by the CIPR will explore the impact of artificial intelligence on public relations, and conversation in the public sphere.

The internet can be a fantastic tool for community development, and learning and development.

In November I wrote about the conversation around the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) and technology on culture and society getting louder.

The impact on employment, skills and media are some of the concerns for public relations. It’s a discussion that is typically characterised by fear and uncertainty, rather than research and evidence.

My blog post kickstarted a series of discussions. In January I hosted a dinner with people who joined the conversation.

The CIPR’s CEO Alastair McCapra and President Sarah Hall expressed a keen interest for the CIPR to get involved. Other practitioners and scholars who have worked in this area joined along the way.

Today the CIPR has announced a panel to explore the impact of artificial intelligence on public relations, and conversation in the public sphere.

Its purpose is very similar to CIPR’s Social Media Panel which led to the publication of guidance for members including Share This and Share This Too.

Projects: tools, workforce and impact on public sphere

We’re aiming to tackle three projects in 2018, each of which will aim to take an evidence led approach:

Robot public relations

A crowdsourcing exercise to characterise technology and tools that are helping public relations practitioners work smarter and more efficiently. It has its genesis in the #PRstack project.

Smarter or smaller?

A skills framework that will seek to estimate the likely impact of artificial intelligence on the public relations workforce. It will aim to produce a paper for the World PR Forum in April.

Impact of AI and algorithms in the public sphere

A literature and content review to explore the impact of artificial intelligence on the public sphere. This project will aim to produce a discussion paper for practitioners.

The panel is kicking off the first project immediately and invites practitioners to submit examples of tools. Everyone participating in the project will be cited in the results.

Panel members

My thanks to Alastair and Sarah for their vision and leadership in backing this initiative, and the panel members who have volunteered their energy, expertise and resource.

  • Chris Holly Chart.PR, Dip CIPR, FCIPR
  • Kerry Sheehan MCIPR, Weber Shandwick
  • Stephen Waddington Found.Chart.PR, Hon FCIPR, Ketchum
  • Alastair McCapra, CIPR Chief Executive
  • Matt Silver MCIPR, Ketchum
  • Sharon O’Dea, MCIPR, Independent consultant
  • Andrew Smith MCIPR, Escherman
  • Maria Loupa, MCIPR, Liberty Communications
  • Professor Anne Gregory Hon FCIPR, University of Huddersfield
  • Jean Valin Hon FCIPR, Valin Strategic Communications
  • Ben Verinder, Found.Chart.PR MCIPR, Chalkstream
  • Dr Jon White Chart.PR, FCIPR, Independent consultant

Outcomes and opportunities to get involved

The panel will contribute and help to lead the conversation around technology and public relations. It will publish guidance for practitioners from each of its projects during 2018.

If you’re interested in getting involved there will be plenty of opportunities. The crowdsourcing project or #AIinPR hashtag on Twitter are good places to start.

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